Michael Kan

About the Author Michael Kan


‘Kill switch’ helps slow the spread of WannaCry ransomware

Friday’s unprecedented ransomware attack may have stopped spreading to new machines — at least briefly — thanks to a “kill switch” that a security researcher has activated.

The ransomware, called Wana Decryptor or WannaCry, has been found infecting machines across the globe. It works by exploiting a Windows vulnerability that the U.S. National Security Agency may have used for spying.

The malware encrypts data on a PC and shows users a note demanding $300 in bitcoin to have their data decrypted. Images of the ransom note have been circulating on Twitter. Security experts have detected tens of thousands of attacks, apparently spreading over LANs and the internet like a computer worm.

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Ransomware attack spreads worldwide using alleged NSA exploit

A ransomware attack appears to be spreading around the world, leveraging a hacking tool that may have come from the U.S. National Security Agency.

The ransomware, called Wanna Decryptor, struck hospitals at the U.K.’s National Health Service on Friday, taking down some of its network.

Spain’s computer response team, CCN-CERT, has also warned of  a “massive attack” from the ransomware strain, amid reports that local telecommunications firm Telefonica was hit.

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A ransomware attack is spreading worldwide, using alleged NSA exploit

A ransomware attack appears to be spreading around the world, leveraging a hacking tool that may have come from the U.S. National Security Agency.

The ransomware, called Wanna Decryptor, struck hospitals at the U.K.’s National Health Service on Friday, taking down some of its network.

Spain’s computer response team, CCN-CERT, has also warned of  a “massive attack” from the ransomware strain, amid reports that local telecommunications firm Telefonica was hit.

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Trump’s cybersecurity order pushes U.S. government to the cloud

President Donald Trump has finally signed a long-awaited executive order on cybersecurity, and he called for the U.S. government to move more into the cloud and modernize its IT infrastructure.

The order, signed on Thursday, is designed to “centralize risk” and move the government’s agencies toward shared IT services, White House homeland security adviser Tom Bossert said in a press briefing   

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Patch to fix Intel-based PCs with enterprise bug rolls out this week

PC vendors this week will start rolling out patches that fix a severe vulnerability found in certain Intel-based business systems, including laptops, making them easier to hack.   

Intel on Friday released a new notice urging clients to take steps to secure their systems.

The chipmaker has also released a downloadable tool that can help IT administrators and users discover whether a machine they own has the vulnerability.

In addition, vendors including Fujitsu, HP and Lenovo have released lists showing which products are affected and when the patches will roll out. 

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Top tips for finding the right cybersecurity products

Having trouble finding the right security products for your business? You’re not the only one.

Today’s market is filled with hundreds of vendors and plenty of marketing hype. But figuring out which solutions are worthwhile can be a challenge, especially for businesses with little experience in cybersecurity.  

So we asked actual buyers of enterprise security products for tips, and here’s what they said.  

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Google Docs phishing scam underscores OAuth security risks

Google has stopped Wednesday’s clever email phishing scheme, but the attack may very well make a comeback.

One security researcher has already managed to replicate it, even as Google is trying to protect users from such attacks.

“It looks exactly like the original spoof,” said Matt Austin, director of security research at Contrast Security.

The phishing scheme — which may have circulated to 1 million Gmail users — is particularly effective because it fooled users with a dummy app that looked like Google Docs.

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Sneaky Gmail phishing attack fools with fake Google Docs app

Google Docs was pulled into a sneaky email phishing attack on Tuesday that was designed to trick users into giving up access to their Gmail accounts.

The phishing emails, which circulated for about three hours before Google stopped them, invited the recipient to open what appeared to be a Google Doc. The teaser was a blue box that said, “Open in Docs.”

In reality, the link led to a dummy app that asked users for permission to access their Gmail account.

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Sneaky Gmail phishing attack fools with fake Google Docs app

Google Docs was pulled into a sneaky email phishing attack on Tuesday that was designed to trick users into giving up access to their Gmail accounts.

The phishing emails, which circulated for about three hours before Google stopped them, invited the recipient to open what appeared to be a Google Doc. The teaser was a blue box that said, “Open in Docs.”

In reality, the link led to a dummy app that asked users for permission to access their Gmail account.

screen shot 2017 05 03 at 2.38.57 pmReddit

An example of the phishing email that circulated on Tuesday.

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Vulnerability hits Intel enterprise PCs going back 10 years

Intel is reporting a firmware vulnerability that could let attackers take over remote management functions on computers built over nearly the past decade.

The vulnerability, disclosed on Monday, affects features in Intel firmware that are designed for enterprise IT management.  

Enterprises using Intel Active Management Technology, Intel Small Business Technology and Intel Standard Manageability on their systems should patch them as soon as possible, the company says.

The vulnerable firmware features can be found in some current Core processors and all the way back to Intel’s first-generation Core, called Nehalem, which shipped in 2008. They’re part of versions 6.0 through 11.6 of Intel’s manageability firmware.

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